When you're driving along the highway on a sunny day with your windows down and your radio volume up, it's easy to forget that you're in a massive chunk of steel and glass hurtling through space at 60-plus miles per hour (97-plus kilometers per hour). At that speed, if you suddenly needed to stop, your vehicle could take approximately the length of a football field (100 yards or 91 meters) to come to a standstill -- and that's only if you've kept one of the most critical safety Ceramic Brake Pad systems in your car well maintained: your brakes.

Brakes may not be the sexiest part of a car, but they're certainly one of the most crucial. Paying attention to the warning signs that indicate a need for service can mean the difference between life and death on the road.

Of course, there are some obvious signs that your brakes need servicing, such as the brake light appearing on your car's dashboard or the feeling that your vehicle is taking longer to stop than it should. In either of these cases, you should visit your local mechanic for a brake check as soon as possible. But do you know what the other signs are that could indicate an ailing brake system?

Unfortunately, there is no clear-cut schedule that tells you when it's time to replace the brakes, so you need to rely on your ears and the advice of an experienced automotive technician. Most vehicles should have their tires rotated at least every six months, and that is a good time to have the brakes inspected, as well. A mechanic can check the thickness of the pads and the condition of the brake hardware to spot wear.

They may not be something you think about very often, but your vehicle's brakes are one feature that should always be in top working condition. Here, antaibrake.com teahc you how to know when you need new brakes.

Top Ten Warning Signs You Need New Brakes:

1. High pitched squealing

2. Vibration in the steering wheel when stopping

3. Grinding noises when stopping

4. Increased braking distances

5. Longer pedal travel

6. Feeling the car “pull” to the left or right when stopping

7. A weak emergency brake

8. A bad smell after coming to a hard stop

9. Pedal “fade”

10. Not stopping

Many cars have built-in wear sensors that scrape against a brake disc when the linings needed replacing. The driver will hear an annoying screeching sound when they apply the brakes (or when the brakes are released on some vehicles).

Those sensors aren't on every vehicle, so drivers should listen for squeaks, squeals, grinding (often a sign that brake pads are entirely gone) and other noises that indicate wear. Some minor noises can be eliminated by cleaning the brakes, but persistent, prominent noises usually mean parts are worn. Other signs are pulsations through the brake pedal, longer stopping distances, or when you apply the brakes your foot goes down further, closer to the floor. Because brake linings wear gradually, you may not notice the demise in performance, so that's where the experienced eye of a mechanic can help.

One exception is if your car has been sitting after being exposed to water, such as from rain or from washing it. The moisture can cause a thin layer of rust to develop on the brake rotors. This is normal. When you first apply the brakes, the pads pressing on the rust-covered rotors may cause a squeal for a few stops until the rust is worn off and then the sound will disappear.

All cars have a brake warning light that comes on for a few seconds every time you start your car. If it comes on while driving, that probably means your brake system is low on fluid because of a leak or a problem with the brake master cylinder. Note that this is not the same warning light that comes on when you apply the hand- or foot-operated parking brake.

All cars and light trucks also have front disc brakes. Most have rear discs, as well, though some lower-priced cars still come with rear drum brakes. With discs, it has been common practice to just replace the brake pads and resurface the rotors on a lathe if needed so the surface is even and smooth.

Vibration. A vibration or pulsating brake pedal is often a symptom of warped rotors (but can also indicate that your vehicle is out of alignment). The vibration can feel similar to the feedback in the brake pedal during a panic stop in a vehicle equipped with anti-lock brakes.

For many owners, maintaining the vehicle's brakes is something that is often overlooked. But keeping your brakes properly calibrated and in good working order can prevent costly repairs down the line, and, more importantly, choose a good Disc Brake Supplier  is important, here , i recommend you antaibrake.com.